Tag Archives: Opportunity Knocks

5 Snazzy Things I Learned About LinkedIn & Networking

LinkedIn boasts some of the most read articles on the interweb including Opportunity Knock’s top blog post.  With 225 million and counting members, LinkedIn has naturally become an extension of networking. Filled with recruiters and robust professional groups, LinkedIn is a haven for the for-profit world, but what about for the nonprofit world?

Social instigator, Kevin J. Wolfe of  DonorDrive answers this question perfectly in his Mashable article, Why Your Nonprofits Needs to Stop Ignoring LinkedIn. Case closed, right? Not exactly. For job seekers, LinkedIn is like a cocktail party according to Mickey Desai of The Nonprofit Snapshot.

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Tonight, I joined the Young Nonprofit Professional Network-Atlanta Chapter along with some of my co-workers for an evening of LinkedIn and networking. The panel of two, Sue Loth of 22Squared & Mickey Desai of The Nonprofit Snapshot talked all about LinkedIn and how to network on LinkedIn. First off, it was so much fun! Now you’re probably saying to yourself, “Really, Yasmine fun? While you’re having fun; everyone else’s palms are sweating profusely.” As an extrovert, I love socializing and obviously tonight’s event was all about that. Plus, it was a great way to kick off post-VISTA  program relations. But, honestly, I think the one thing I loved about tonight’s networking event was that there was no pressure. I’m not on the job hunt so networking was truly getting to know people in the industry.  Unlike other networking events I’ve gone to where I’ve felt like I needed to leave with multiple contacts AND a job offer. The things PRSSA does to you… Plus, we got FREE headshot!

Courtney at the Foundation Center representing GCN

Second, I learned some snazzy things about LinkedIn and networking. Being the weirdo I am, I love talking career advice, job hunting, and all of that jazz so while people were asking questions I was trying to NOT answer all the questions.

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Despite knowing most of the answers to the questions, I did learn a few new things.  Here’s five things that I thought were super cool:

  1. “Facebook is a toy. LinkedIn is a tool.” -Mickey Desai
  2. You should pay it forward when networking.
  3. LinkedIn’s summary is an opportunity to tell your career story
  4. Consciously expand your network via LinkedIn
  5. It’s less about who YOU know and more about who THEY may know – Sue Loth

Obviously, I can’t give too much of the goods away because I’m writing a piece on the event for Opportunity Knocks :) But, I couldn’t help but to share the knowledge and experience with you guys!

If you’re in the Atlanta-area come visit and chat!

-Yasmine, the Nonprofit Newb

Embracing Your Status

They tell you that you’re going to be living below poverty line and your mouth drops open. College educated and poor by social status, my cohort and fellow VISTAs embrace it. We live with our parents and roommates, roughing it pay check to pay check. We become more than just service-minded world changers— we become college educated po’ folks.

Georgia Center for Nonprofits’ Newest Cohort!

In this moment, I realize that this year’s journey is more than just professional development, it’s an opportunity to change what’s around me. An opportunity to listen socially. Now you may ask, what is social listening. According to Social Media Examiner, social listening “enables decision-makers to find and better understand opportunities and stakeholders.”

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In other words, an opportunity to engage with people via social media. For me, this is

“a chance to connect service-minded professionals with socially conscious career opportunities.”

On Friday, I started perusing the online world to kick off of Opportunity Knock‘s online presence with some social listening. Checking out who was looking for nonprofit jobs and how I could help them connect the dots.

OK MENTION
Social Listening Builds Relationships

Sometimes the act of social listening can be misconstrued and become annoying and invasion of privacy, but in my opinion you have to become uncomfortable to become comfortable. This feeling of being uncomfortable presents a true commonality between impoverished people and most job seekers: they are embarrassed. Impoverished people hide that they rely on food stamps while job seekers shy away from networking and putting themselves out there. However, through the process of social listening, I plan to diminish this embarrassment and remind nonprofit job seekers to embrace their status so they can stand for something greater. In turn, encouraging impoverished people to no longer be embarrassed.

For more information on cool nonprofit jobs, check out Opportunity Knocks! And for my favorite sites for social listening: Topsy.com & SocialMention.com